Food News blog

Vitamins for the immune system: give yourself a boost naturally

by anna on March 16, 2018 No comments

Vitamins for the immune system through food rather than a bottle.

Are you sick of a cold? Want to fix it?

Thinking about vitamin C, zinc, and fluids? Well, you’ve ticked a few boxes, but I think you’ll find it’s not that simple. Our immune system is a complicated network of cells, tissues and organs working together to protect the body and it’s affected by many factors! We do know some particular vitamins for the immune system which are easy to get through food. The research is telling us:

  • Extra Vitamin C helps to shorten the duration of a cold
  • Zinc deficiency is common in Australians and may reduce immunity
  • Probiotics strengthen the immune system
  • It’s important to get enough Vitamin A and Vitamin E, but there is no point in taking supplements beyond the recommended daily intake (RDI)
  • The jury is still out on the impact of Selenium on immunity
  • There isn’t strong evidence to say sugar directly affects the immune system
  • There is no evidence behind chicken soup in particular, -but it is tasty, high in protein and soothing!

This stuff is fascinating to read but what do we need to eat? The dietitians at My Nutrition Clinic practice the ‘food first’ approach before considering the expensive stuff in the bottles for extra help. Here are 10 steps to stronger immunity:

      1. Vitamin C is needed for growth and repair. Be sure to enjoy 2-3 serves fruit and 2.5 cups of vegetables every day. Kiwi fruit, capsicum, cauliflower, strawberries and broccoli are great sources. Oh, and oranges of course!
      2. Vitamin A is an antioxidant and has many roles in the immune system. Sweet potato, carrots, pumpkin and spinach have Vitamin A. Chicken liver has heaps too, but be careful not to over-do it.
      3. Protein isn’t just for muscles. Protein breaks down into amino acids needed for the immune system. Meat, fish, chicken, egg, dairy, nuts, beans and legumes help us to fight illness and keep us strong. Enjoy these every day.
      4. Meat, fish, chicken and egg stand out again! Try pairing iron-rich foods with high vitamin C foods for better absorption in the body. Steak and salad?
      5. Meat, oysters, milk and wheat bran help us meet our zinc requirements. We need zinc to build the immune system, heal wounds and taste flavours effectively.
      6. Omega-3 fatty acids are a must. Enjoy oily fish (salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel) 2-3 times a week and add some walnuts to your day. Chia seeds can help out too.
      7. As soon as you’re thirsty you’re already dehydrated, eek! Tea, hot lemon waters, and soup count towards your fluid intake.
      8. Moderate exercise each day helps your immune system and reduces stress! Every little bit of movement helps.
      9. Unwind before bed and schedule enough sleep. 7-9 hours a night is optimal for most people.
      10. Stress Less and don’t forget to breathe! Listen to music you love. Have a laugh. Take time (even 1 minute) to completely relax. Those that are less stressed have stronger immune systems.

Some things are easier to control than others, right? Tick off the foods and vitamins for the immune system you can tackle easily. Firstly, try to get enough fruit and veg to get your vitamins. Then some oily fish, lean meat and dairy for the protein, iron, zinc, and omega-3 fats. Don’t forget to sleep well, move your body, relax and stay hydrated!

Do you want help building these steps into your own eating plan? See a dietitian at My Nutrition Clinic who can translate the aspirational into the doable!

 A list of vitamins for the immune system

Foods and vitamins for the immune system

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annaVitamins for the immune system: give yourself a boost naturally

Plan for an empty lunchbox and take the sting out of getting ready for school

by anna on January 20, 2018 No comments

Plan a weekly lunchbox menu together with your kids using a few easy steps

Step 1

Set some ground rules about what needs to go in the lunchbox and what will stay out. Things like:

  • It includes at least 1-2 vegetables every day
  • There can be no packets
  • Jam sandwiches are only on Fridays

Step 2

Make 2 lists of vegetables together. The first is a list of their favourite vegetables and the second list of vegetables that they think are OK.

Plan to have one of the favourite and one of the ‘OK’ veggies in the lunchbox each day. Regularly having the ‘OK’ vegetables in there increases their taste for them so they eventually move over to the favourite list. Don’t be worried if the ‘OK’ vegetable comes back every day for a while. The more they see it (and sometimes have a bite or two), the more they will like the taste. This is the foundation of helping kids develop healthy eating habits that will last a lifetime.  Think about the first time you tried beer or coffee. It didn’t taste too good to start with but we persisted until eventually we couldn’t live without it! 🙂


Step 3

Make a list of carbohydrate foods that they like and what would work well in a lunchbox. Are they willing to try a healthier alternative? Would they like to taste or try it at home before adding it to their lunchbox. Talk about healthy alternatives including:

  • Grainary or wholemeal bread and wraps
  • High fibre crackers e.g. Ryvita, Vita-wheat
  • Brown or basmati rice
  • Wholemeal pasta and spaghetti
  • Baked beans

 


Step 4

Make a list of favourite fruits that will fit in the lunch box.

Use sealable containers so that it can be chopped up and kept fresh. Limit fruit to one medium sized fruit and save the other portion of fruit for after school or after dinner.

Step 5

Choose a high protein food.  A small portion (child-sized) is all that is needed and it will help to keep them full through the afternoon. Stick to healthy and lean meats that can be kept cool and safe in the lunchbox. You can also pick up a cheap food thermos to keep food hot if you prefer. Some examples are

  • Tinned tuna/salmon and light mayo
  • Ham
  • Cheese
  • Roast or baked chicken breast
  • Baked beans (hot or cold) – and yes baked beans are both a meat alternative (protein source) and carboydrate (energy and fibre source) all at the same time!!

Step 6

Put all the lunchbox ideas into a weekly timetable and stick it on the fridge. Kids like predictability so you might want to repeat the lunchbox ideas on the same day every week. You can make it a regular thing to sit down every school holidays to plan the next term’s ‘menu’.

Having a timetable also makes putting your shopping list together a bit easier as well. You can download a copy of these tips (useful when you sit down for your planning session) and a page to record your menu in the link below

Lunchbox Menu Plan

Where is the treat?

Before you start adding high sugar or fat treats like biscuits, cakes, chocolate, juices or lollies to the lunchbox, ask yourself, ‘What part of my child’s body or mind will this food nourish?’ They give energy but if the lunchbox has all the ingredients discussed above then your child’s energy needs will be met. If you think they need more then increase the portions and it will also give them the extra B vitamins and fibre that they need to go along with it.

Perhaps you feel that children need to have sweets just to make them feel good. We all love to see our children smile but using food as a reward can set up a lifelong habit of comfort eating and unwanted weight gain when they are older. It is a hard habit to break as an adult so better to not create the habit in the first place. Fruit gives children the balance of sweet food that is nice in a meal.  Try writing a joke on a post-it, a small toy or even using art and craft materials to put a smile on their dial!

 

HAPPY PLANNING!

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annaPlan for an empty lunchbox and take the sting out of getting ready for school

Our bones hold us up, but are we letting them down?

by anna on January 7, 2018 No comments

It’s easy to think about other body systems –we see our skin, feel our weight, see with eyes, think with our brain, notice our guts regularly, and keep happy with a heartbeat, but what about our bones? It turns out a bone is fractured every 3.6 minutes in Australia… uh, excuse me? Yep, osteoporosis and musculoskeletal conditions are a National Health Priority Area in Aus and they’re only getting worse. By 2022 there’ll be a bone fracture every 2.9 minutes! It’s not doing any good for us, our families or our healthcare system. So why is it happening and what can we do about it?

Sure, there are plenty of things we can’t control. Having a family history of osteoporosis increases your chances of getting rickety bones, -so does ageing and your medical history. But you CAN do something about your diet and lifestyle! You’ve got better chances of keeping strong bones by not smoking or drinking too much, keeping active, and getting some sunshine (i.e. vitamin D). You’ll also be better off if you’re getting enough calcium in your diet.

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body.

It’s not only in our bones and teeth but our body fluids as well. It helps out with sending messages between nerves, blood clotting, and maintaining muscle tone. So it’s pretty vital. But the issue is that we lose calcium every day through skin, sweat, nails, hair, urine and faeces. Unless we put enough in the mouth to replenish what we lose, our bodies start chipping away at our bones. Just think; every day you don’t eat enough calcium, your bones get slightly weaker. If you’re doing this regularly, your bones become weaker more quickly.

We know there’s calcium in dairy foods which are also great because they have plenty of high quality protein (and they taste good!). But there are plenty of people avoiding dairy for one reason or another these days, so we wanted to offer some alternatives. Tinned fish (with bones), some leafy greens, tofu, tahini (sesame paste), and almonds are sources of calcium –but not as good as dairy foods.

How much calcium is enough? I could tell you the numbers, but you can’t eat numbers, so I’ll show you ‘in food’ below! As you can see in the table, the example vegan diet shows the plant foods with the highest sources of calcium. If you’re not having calcium-fortified drinks and tofu it may be a struggle to get enough in.

Is the answer in a pill? Quite frankly, no. Calcium supplements have shown to increase the risk of heart attack and kidney stones when taken in doses over 500mg/day. It’s best to get your calcium from foods in the diet, and doctors agree.

Put these in your shopping trolley:

  • Dairy isle: go for low fat milk, yoghurt and cheese (limit high-fat soft cheese)
    • Aim for 3 serves a day (250ml milk, 200g yoghurt, 40g cheese)
    • Use yoghurts in soups, curries and salads
    • Add skim milk powder to soups, casseroles, smoothies
  • Tinned fish with bones: salmon, sardines
    • Idea: fish patties, salmon salad, mashed sardines with lemon juice and pepper on crackers
  • Tofu tofu tofu: I say it 3 times because there are so many varieties these days!
    • Check the ingredients and be sure to pick the ‘calcium-set’ variety
    • Marinade in spices and pop into a stir fry with veg (it might just taste like chicken!)
  • Almond and sesame: try almond butter or tahini on toast, or in a smoothie with calcium-rich milk
  • Greens: bok choy, kale, broccoli, collard greens, celery, cucumber
  • Dried figs hit the spot when you’re after something sweet

Find out more about bone health visit the Osteoporosis Australia website and of course, come and see the Gold Coast dietitians at My Nutrition Clinic to help you to make sure you’re getting enough nutrients in your diet.

Bones and food

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annaOur bones hold us up, but are we letting them down?

Get more energy and go glycemic

by anna on January 7, 2018 No comments

High Energy Foods without the bulge

Having more energy is the elusive holy grail these days. ‘I’m knackered’ is becoming the new standard response when friends ask how things are going.   It’s the world we live in today – we work hard, play hard, get up earlier and go to bed later. So how can our diet help?

When we eat carbohydrates, they get broken down into sugars. This sugar gets into the bloodstream and triggers the body to release insulin. This helps to convert the sugar into energy which is used by the brain, muscles and liver. Insulin works slowly (over a couple of hours) so while you have a surplus of sugar circulating in your body, you will have extra energy as well.

But when the sugar is all gone you’ll notice a big drop in energy levels and you can end up feeling more tired than when you started. Not ideal. It is like being stuck in a mouse wheel – always chasing the next high. But you can get out of this rat race by being smart with your carbs.

Carbs with a low glycaemic index (or ‘GI’) release sugars slowly. This allows the insulin to keep up with the supply, preventing spikes and dips in energy levels. A low GI diet gives consistent energy through the day and helps you avoid ‘hitting the wall’ between meals. Be the tortoise who is happily chugging along all day, rather than the hare that runs out of steam before the finish line (the next meal)!

What are the benefits of going low GI? 

If you have diabetes, this is one of the main dietary tactics we use to better control blood sugars without the need to reduce the carbs in the diet dramatically. All of the evidence-based recommendations for the management of diabetes from the major diabetes organisations around the world (the American Diabetes AssociationCanadian Diabetes Association and Diabetes UK for example) now advise people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to use the GI or glycemic load (GL) as part of the nutritional management of their condition.

If you have gestational diabetes, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics have recently recommended a focus on lower GI foods. “Low GI diets are associated with less frequent insulin use and lower birth weight than in control diets, suggesting that it is the most appropriate dietary intervention to be prescribed to patients with GDM,” they say.

If you have high cholesterol, recent research provided high-level evidence that high-fibre, low GI diets can significantly reduce total and LDL cholesterol levels, independent of weight loss.

If you have lost weight and want to keep it off, there has been some convincing evidence that a  moderately high protein, low GI diet is the best for longer-term weight management.

What foods are low GI? 

Well you can check the exact GI of a food through glycemicindex.com. The University of Sydney regularly test new foods and update the database with foods and their GI score. A low GI food has a score less than 55.

But we can’t be checking websites everytime we want to eat something so here is our summary/tips on how to get an overall lower GI diet and more sustainable energy. Below this snazzy infographic are our lists of products which are low GI to add to your shoping list.

Low Glycemic Index

 

Our top low GI breads, crackers and wraps:

  • Bürgen® Soy-Lin/Rye/Pumpkin seeds/wholemeal and seeds bread
  • Tip Top® 9 Grain™ Original Bread
  • Helga’s Lower Carb 5 range
  • Mission White Corn Totillas
  • Country LIfe Gluten Free Low GI white bread
  • Wholemeal Rye Bread (no specific brand)
  • Bürgen® Fruit Loaf
  • Wholegrain pumpernickel bread
  • Sourdough rye bread (no specific brand)
  • Bakers Delight™ Hi Fibre Lo GI white bread
  • Bakers Life 85% lower carb, higher protein bread (Aldi)
  • Hermon Brot lower carb bread
  • Ryvita crackers

Our top low GI breakfast cereals

  • Allbran (all types except Wheat Flakes)
  • Muesli (Vogels, Bürgen®, Purina, Freedom Foods, Sanitarium, Morning Sun, Naytura Fruit and Nut)
  • Porridge* (made from rolled or steel cut oats)
  • Special K
  • Guardian
  • Guardian Oat Puffs
  • Sustain, Vogel’s Ultra Bran Soy and Linseed
  • Semolina
  • Goodness Superfoods cereals

Our top low GI rice and pasta

  • SunRice® Doongara™ Low GI Brown Rice
  • SunRice® Low GI Steamed White Rice
  • Moolgiri Rice
  • Basmati Rice
  • Mahatma Long Grain White Rice
  • Rice noodles
  • Egg Fettuccine
  • Lasagne
  • Linguine
  • Fresh Rice Noodles
  • Ravioli
  • Wholemeal Spaghetti and pasta
  • Vetta pasta range
  • Hermon Brot Lower Carb Pasta

Our top low GI (starchy) vegetables (those not mentioned have negligible carbohytrates)

  • Sweet Potato
  • Sweet Corn
  • Carisma Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Taro
  • Green Peas
  • Butternut Pumpkin (boiled)
  • Cooked and cooled Potato (increases the resistent starch = good for your gut!)
  • Parsnips (boiled)
  • Legumes (peas/beans/lentils)
  • Soy beans
  • Kidney beans
  • Baked beans
  • Lima beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Split peas
  • Haricot beans
  • Butter beans

Top low GI dairy foods

Just a note here because the carbohydrate in dairy foods are from lactose which is naturally a very low GI carbohydrate. The problem is when these foods have lots of sugar added to the mix.

  • Greek-style yoghurt, natural flavour
  • Low-fat milk (Pura Tone, Physical reduced fat and no fat, skim etc)
  • Low-fat yoghurt (natural, vanilla or fruit)
  • So Good
  • Low-fat ice cream
  • Low Fat Custard
  • Cheese
  • Yoplait Le Rice
  • Yakult

FIVE SIMPLE STEPS TO BALANCE YOUR BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS – BEYOND THE GI

We don’t eat foods in isolation, so how do we EAT and put meals together to ensure they are filling, nutritious and won’t pile on the pounds? Also if you have diabetes or pre-diabetes, you need to balance the ‘sugar’ books, so keep these steps in your mind when planning out your meals.

  1. Eat mostly unprocessed, unrefined foods such as fresh fruit, vegetables, legumes, whole grain bread and cereals, meat, fish, and dairy
  2. Watch your portions –eating lots of ‘low GI’ carbohydrate foods still increase your blood sugar levels!
  3. Make sure each meal has some protein (meat, chicken, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, yoghurt, beans, nuts)
  4. Eat regularly: 3 meals and 2 snacks each day will help to keep your blood sugar at a consistent level and prevent spikes and dips in energy
  5. Eat a variety of foods –fill a whole grain sandwich with lean meat and salad, then have a piece of fruit or yoghurt as a snack.

For a personalised low GI eating plan and recipe ideas, book an appointment to see one of the dietitians at My Nutrition Clinic.

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annaGet more energy and go glycemic

Our bones hold us up, but are we letting them down? Calcium in food

by anna on August 11, 2017 No comments

It’s easy to think about other body systems –we see our skin, feel our weight, see with eyes, think with our brain, notice our guts regularly, and keep happy with a heartbeat, but what about our bones? It turns out a bone is fractured every 3.6 minutes in Australia… uh, excuse me? Yep, osteoporosis and musculoskeletal conditions are a National Health Priority Area in Aus and they’re only getting worse. By 2022 there’ll be a bone fracture every 2.9 minutes! It’s not doing any good for us, our families or our healthcare system. So why is it happening and what can we do about it?

Sure, there are plenty of things we can’t control. Having a family history of osteoporosis increases your chances of getting rickety bones, -so does ageing and your medical history. But you CAN do something about your diet and lifestyle! You’ve got better chances of keeping strong bones by not smoking or drinking too much, keeping active, and getting some sunshine (i.e. vitamin D). You’ll also be better off if you’re getting enough calcium in food.

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. 

It’s not only in our bones and teeth, but our body fluids as well. It helps out with sending messages between nerves, blood clotting, and maintaining muscle tone. So it’s pretty vital. But the issue is that we lose calcium every day through skin, sweat, nails, hair, urine and faeces. Unless we put enough in the mouth to replenish what we lose, our bodies start chipping away at our bones. Just think; every day you don’t eat enough calcium, your bones get slightly weaker. If you’re doing this regularly, your bones become weaker more quickly.

We know there’s calcium in dairy foods which are also great because they have plenty of high quality protein (and they taste good!). But there are plenty of people avoiding dairy for one reason or another these days, so we wanted to offer some alternatives. Tinned fish (with bones), some leafy greens, tofu, tahini (sesame paste), and almonds are sources of calcium –but not as good as dairy foods.

How much calcium is enough? I could tell you the numbers, but you can’t eat numbers, so I’ll show you ‘in food’ below! As you can see in the table, the example vegan diet shows the plant foods with the highest sources of calcium. If you’re not having calcium-fortified drinks and tofu it may be a struggle to get enough in.

How to get enough calcium on a vegan diet

Get enough calcium on a vegan diet

Is the answer in a pill? Quite frankly, no. Calcium supplements have shown to increase the risk of heart attack and kidney stones when taken in doses over 500mg/day. It’s best to get your calcium from foods in the diet, and doctors agree.

Put these in your shopping trolley:

Dairy isle: go for low-fat milk, yoghurt and cheese (limit high-fat soft cheese)

  • Aim for 3 serves a day (250ml milk, 200g yoghurt, 40g cheese)
  • Use yoghurts in soups, curries and salads
  • Add skim milk powder to soups, casseroles, smoothies

Tinned fish with bones: salmon, sardines

  • Idea: fish patties, salmon salad, mashed sardines with lemon juice and pepper on crackers

Tofu tofu tofu: I say it 3 times because there are so many varieties these days!

  • Check the ingredients and be sure to pick the ‘calcium-set’ variety
  • Marinade in spices and pop into a stir fry with veg (it might just taste like chicken!)

Almond and sesame: try almond butter or tahini on toast, or in a smoothie with calcium-rich milk

Greens: bok choy, kale, broccoli, collard greens, celery, cucumber

Dried figs hit the spot when you’re after something sweet

Cereals fortified with calcium: Special K, Uncle Tobys Plus Calcium

Find out more about bone health visit the Osteoporosis Australia website and of course, come and see the Gold Coast dietitians at My Nutrition Clinic to help you to make sure you’re getting enough nutrients in your diet.

Bones and food

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annaOur bones hold us up, but are we letting them down? Calcium in food

Eggcellent Easter tips!

by anna on April 13, 2017 No comments

Here are a few interesting bits of trivia to amaze your family and friends with over this Easter break!

1. One measly gram of chocolate takes one minute of brisk walking to burn off. That’s right. Your exercise prescription is kindly written on the egg’s foil wrapper (read “grams” as “minutes of moderate intensity exercise”). And brisk means brisk. Ambling on your walk can nearly double the time required to burn the same amount of calories.

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annaEggcellent Easter tips!

Whats for dinner?

by anna on January 12, 2017 No comments

It is a question we ask ourselves every day and yet the answers never come easy!

There is no shortage of recipes out there but have you ever wanted a list of ‘Dietitian approved’ recipes that you can be confident are good for you? Well the lovely people at the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA), Dietitians of Canada and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Eat right) in the USA have got lots for you to choose from. Most of the recipes come with extra tips and ideas for how to modify them it to suit different tastes and increase variety.  And best of all, most of them are simple, only use a few ingredients and are easy to make. No celebrity chef skills required.

Australian Dietitian’s “Smart Eating’ recipes
These recipes have been tried and tested by Australian Dietitians so you know they will be good for you. And rest assured there are some yummy ‘sometimes’ meals in there too! It is all about balance and enjoyment!

DAA Australian Healthy Weight Week :
The Australian Healthy Weight Week is coming up ( 13-19th February) and to inspire everyone to eat a little better, the DAA have developed a website with lots of recipes, meal plans and tips. Download the free cookbook to get you started here.

Dietitians of Canada Cookspiration:
These clever Dietitians have taken it a step further and created an app that is very easy to use and organises the recipes by mood and time of day! All the recipes have clear instructions, pictures and nutrition labels. You can use it on your iPhone, iPad and Android devices.

Eatright recipes and tips:
The Americans have hundreds of recipes that you can search from with pictures and nutrition information. You can sort the recipes into just the kid-friendly ones too which is helpful. Many of the recipes have an American feel so some of them may feel a little adventurous.

We would love to hear what you think of these. Please share your favourites on our Facebook page so that others can pick from them.

Warm regards

Cherie and Anna

 

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annaWhats for dinner?

A NEAT secret to easy exercise

by anna on December 20, 2016 No comments
In the final part of our ‘mini-series’ about the pillars of successful weight management, Exercise Physiologist, Tobias Atkins has written about his easy approach to getting more physically activity! Tobias believes in combining education with movement and has supported countless clients to reach their weight management goals and health potential. Enjoy!

Tobias

Hi everyone, I want to let you all in on a little secret! I am actually a little bit of a lazy person.  I like to cheat sometimes, especially with exercise!  I want to reach my goals with the least amount of effort. 

This might be a surprise coming from someone who has dedicated their life to health and exercise. But the one thing you will learn about me is I am not your usual health/ exercise professional. Truth is I actually hate the word exercise; it’s scary, often comes with negative thoughts and emotions and above all gives so much emphasis on the actual exercise that is takes away from the MOVEMENT of the body.

The American College of Sports Medicine say that 150-250 minutes/week of moderate-intensity physical activity provides only modest weight loss. Greater amounts (i.e. >250) provide clinically significant weight loss. But the truth is we just need to move more. This brings in a whole other topic I would like to share with you today. It’s called NEAT.

NEAT stands for non-exercise activity thermogenesis. NEAT is the Kilojoules you burn when not exercising. More than just basal metabolic rate (lie down do nothing and measure how much KJ you burn).  NEAT includes everything from fiddling to involuntary movement when you sleep. And the amount of NEAT movement you do can have a big impact on your weight! 

Most of the variance in NEAT between people is associated with differences in occupation.  For example if an office worker were to change occupation and worked in agriculture or construction, researchers in one study estimated that NEAT could be increased by 1200kcal per day (Levine J, 2001). That is equal to an extra two-course meal in your day!  

So what if you are not planning to switch careers just yet? Is there anything else you can do?  Yes – simply standing more during your day you can burn more calories. Some research on a small group of lean and overweight people found that the lean group stood for an extra 164 minutes a day (Levine J, 2005). All this extra time simply standing could burn 350 kcals per day. This about the same amount of calories you would burn if you met the American College of Sports Medicine recommended weekly minutes of moderate activity! 

So here are my tips for avoiding exercise classes: 

1. Be more active in your down-time:  

  • Try to include some ‘active travel’ in your daily drive by parking a bit further away from the office and walk the rest of the way
  • Look for the car park farthest away from the shops
  • Get out in the garden after work or finish that DIY that you have been putting off.
  • Use the stairs
  • Go out of your way to give yourself more opportunities to be active
2. Stand more: 
  • Watching TV uses very little energy so try to incorporate some housework while you watch (something that involves standing)
  • Stand and walk around while you talk on the phone
  • Have a stand-up or walking meeting
If you want to get a measure of your NEAT, you can try on of the following:
  • Take note of the time you are awake in a chosen day and compare the amount of time you spend sitting down. This includes sitting at lunch to eat your food or in your car on the way to work. Simply use your phones stopwatch and pause the counter when you are standing or moving around resuming the timer when you sit. Then look to reduce this time slightly the following week and do the same thing the week after.
  • Another way we can look at our movement is by looking at our steps accomplished a day. Obviously this isn’t going to account for every movement we do but it is a very good indicator. The general aim is for 10,000 steps a day however this doesn’t account for different fitness levels or personal positions but it is a good place to start.
  • Most smart phones these days have their own versions of step counters or activity counters in built in them just waiting for you to source them out! Get out there and find any way to measure your movement!!

The take home message is to MOVE MORE! Enjoy the cheating!

Thank you Tobias. I am standing while I type!

For those of you who have been enjoying Glen’s Thursday Therapy, watch up for the next email which has more information about the Total Mind Transformation programme starting in January and a discount for My Nutrition Clinic Clients. We will also be sending out some recipe ideas and good places to search for healthy recipes. Just what you need for planning the Xmas meals!

Warm regards

Cherie and Anna

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annaA NEAT secret to easy exercise

No More Dieting

by anna on December 10, 2016 No comments

 

Hello,

We hope you got a chance to have a look at Glenn Mackintosh’s YouTube channel – we think it’s a great way to get some free support.

You will notice that the underlying approach he takes is one psychologists and dietitians (including us at My Nutrition Clinic) are gravitating towards – it’s called non-dieting.

Why non-dieting?

When trying to lose weight, people are initially very motivated and typically go fairly “gung-ho” with a food and exercise plan.  They initially lose some weight and feel better, but then when the motivation subsides, old habits can creep back in as does the lost weight (often with some interest!)

Sometimes something happens to trigger the sabotage – a busy period at work, an injury or illness, or school holidays for example.  Or sometimes the motivation just wanes or disappears completely.  But often the sabotage startslong before the triggering event – with a sense of deprivation of food, unsustainable exercise goals or slower than expected weight loss. In fact ‘not losing weight’ is often the main reason people stop a ‘weight management’ programme. So we give up the new healthy habits we only just started because we didn’t see the scales move.

What if we started eating better and moving more because it makes us feel good about ourselves, gives us more energy and improves our health – and not just because of a number

A ‘non-dieting’ approach takes the focus off the number of kgs lost and highlights the many benefits of eating well and getting active –  feeling healthier, having more energy and feeling stronger. Keep focused on the gains rather than the losses!Here are some examples of what we mean in practice:

  • Eat healthy food because it gives you more energy for longer and balances your mood.
  • Enjoy physical activity because of the rush of endorphins and the better sleep you have that night.
  • Listen to your body and eat when you are hungry and stop when you are full (and be able to tell the difference).
Although this won’t be for everyone,  Research tells us that the non-dieting approach works better than strict dieting in the long-term, and results in such benefits as:
  • Improved blood pressure, blood sugar levels, and physical wellbeing
  • Improved mood, self-esteem, and body-image
  • Improved eating, physical activity, and a healthier lifestyle.

Our suggestion is that if you have tried lots of ‘diets’ in the past and are looking for something different – this may be the missing part of the puzzle that you have been looking for.So how do you get started? Here are some practical tools to get you off on the right foot.

Intuitive eating: Eat when you are hungry and stop when you are full. 
Use this handout if you want to understand if you are eating because of hunger or other reasons (e.g. emotions, boredom). Alternatively use this fun hunger scale to check in with your hunger. 🙂

mindful-eating-with-emojis-1-638

Mindful eating: When we take notice of what we eat, we usually eat less and choose food that is better for us! 

Give some of these little exercises a go. I haven’t met anyone yet who hasn’t enjoyed the experience! They take about 3-4 minutes and although you won’t be able to eat like this at meal times, it really helps you slow down your eating which helps you eat the right amount for your body.

Mindful eating with a raisin

Mindful eating with a chocolate

Well I hope those exercises are useful and you can utilise them over the coming weeks of celebrations!

If you like the idea of non-dieting, the strengthening of your mind for a healthier you and want more information, have a look at the programme that we are running with Glenn Mackintosh next year: The Twelve Month Transformation 2017. Glenn has already run this sell-out programme a few times in Brisbane and we are fortunate to be able to offer it on the Gold Coast in 2017 (with a special early-bird discount for our clients!).  I’ll let you know more about the program soon, but in case you’re super keen to find out about it you can see some client stories of the benefits of non-dieting through the program, so you can get a feel for the type of benefits the program offers!

Talk soon,

Anna and Cherie
My Nutrition Clinic

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annaNo More Dieting

The missing piece in the the weight management puzzle

by anna on December 6, 2016 No comments

There are 3 simple (but not easy) steps to achieving a healthy weight. If you have already seen one of our Dietitians in the clinic, you will have a pretty good idea of what to eat so we wanted to give you some information about getting into the right frame of mind for reaching a healthy weight.

So it is at this point we will introduce you to our friend Glenn Mackintosh.  Glenn is one of Australia’s leading weight management psychologists and is working with us at our new headquarters in Robina.  You can find out more about him and his credentials from the link above,  but we like him because he’s really good at explaining evidence-based ideas in an easy and relatable way (not “psychologisty” at all!).

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annaThe missing piece in the the weight management puzzle